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Month: February 2021

Master of Manipulation

Veterinary Medical Manipulation Case Study

Palm Beach Equine Clinic Veterinarian Dr. Ryan Lukens Veterinary Chiropractic Adjustment Manipulation vertebrae

When the “chiropractor” visits the barn to adjust your horse, what’s really being done is called veterinary medical manipulation, which Dr. Ryan Lukens, DVM, CVMMP, of Palm Beach Equine Clinic defines as the art of improving motion at segmental levels, including bones, the supporting soft tissue structure, and nerves. The ultimate goal of veterinary medical manipulation is to allow free movement throughout the horse’s body by restoring normal range of motion.

The way Dr. Lukens determines what specific segments to manipulate is by motion palpation, or by examining for a decrease in motion. Not only does this have the ability to relieve pain and soreness, but it also reduces the chance of horses having to physically compensate for an area of their body that may not be functioning properly. This act of compensating for being off balance is a frequent cause of sport horse injuries. Regular adjustments by a certified veterinary medical manipulation practitioner helps the horse to maintain their natural balance and full range of motion to perform at the best of their ability.  

Medical manipulation can benefit every horse, from miniature pasture pets to grand prix equine athletes. In addition to improving their range of motion, adjustments can help calm nerves associated with the “fight or flight” instinct.  This can lead to calming effects across various bodily systems such as neutralizing stomach acids, lowering blood pressure and cortisol, and strengthening the immune system.

Case Study

One notable case Dr. Lukens recalls involved a nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding was training at Third Level dressage. The horse was roughly 300 pounds overweight and was too head shy to even have a fly mask put on. Under work, it presented with right front limb lameness and stiffness on the left while traveling left. Balance is essential for dressage, and this horse struggled with its natural balance.

Aerial view showing the spines of both scapula bones clearly visible because of the lack of musculature. Dr. Ryan Lukens Palm Beach Equine Clinic
Aerial view showing the spines of both scapula bones clearly visible because of the lack of musculature.

The horse showed severe cavitation of the muscling in its neck at the first evaluation. The divots seen in the neck indicate the atrophy of the paracervical muscles which is not normal. Though circumstances like this are seen often, it can be a sign that the horse’s nerves are not functioning properly, and that the muscles are suffering. When adjusting the horse, Dr. Lukens found that the horse had restricted movement at the poll and cervical vertebrae 5, 6, and 7 to the left, which essentially covers the whole lower neck on that side, and the sixth cervical vertebrae on the right side.

Atrophied paracervical muscles, shown as divots in the neck, improved after just two sessions and four weeks of training. Dr. Ryan Lukens Palm Beach Equine Clinic
Atrophied paracervical muscles, shown as divots in the neck, improved after just two sessions and four weeks of training.

The horse tolerated the adjustments and was more welcoming to hands on the neck, face, and ears after the manipulations Dr. Lukens performed. Four weeks later, after just two sessions, the muscles appeared more filled out in the neck, signaling improvement. On the left side of the neck, the muscle mass became very convex, signifying proper muscle tone. Dr. Lukens adjusted only the head and neck while treating the horse to see what changed and how the horse performed before making further adjustments. The horse lost about 100 pounds of fat with training, and the right front lameness improved without any other treatment or medical manipulation.

Convex musculature of the neck showing a significant improvement after manipulation sessions. Dr. Ryan Lukens Palm Beach Equine Clinic
Convex musculature of the neck showing a significant improvement after manipulation sessions.

“The diagonal lameness that this horse presented could have been the result of lower cervical pain,” said Dr. Lukens. “The underdevelopment of the muscles of the cervical region that support the scapula was a large clue to the primary problem of this horse’s lameness.”

“Restrictions in the cervical region can cause the horse to keep its head in an extended position and decrease the range of motion within the facet joints of the vertebrae. This decrease, along with local inflammation and the overall restricted range of motion, causes a decrease in the frequency of nerve firings. Nerves that are not firing properly can lead to cartilage degeneration, adhesions, and decreased circulation,” he continued.

Often issues a horse presents physically can be tied back to its inability to access its full range of motion. It is important to have horses routinely examined by a certified veterinary medical manipulation practitioner to ensure proper range of motion, especially if they have demanding jobs that could exacerbate minor injuries with continued work. Dr. Lukens believes that a veterinarian trained in medical manipulation is the safest choice for the horse.

“A veterinarian’s extensive knowledge of anatomy and understanding of when not to adjust a horse is key. Medical manipulation is a safe treatment if performed by the correct practitioner under the correct circumstances. A veterinarian can use a whole-body approach to treating lameness or enhancing performance while ensuring the horse’s safety and well-being.”

Dr. Lukens

To learn more about veterinary medical manipulation or to schedule an evaluation for your horse, contact Palm Beach Equine Clinic by calling 561-793-1599.


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Surprise – It’s a Boy: A Friesian’s Journey to Becoming a Gelding

When Debbie Cruz imported her 2012 Friesian from Europe, she was excited to welcome the gelding into her life. However, the mount she purchased as a gelding from The Netherlands still had a lot of stallion left in him. Literally.

Marquis, Cruz’s hopeful dressage mount, arrived safe and sound to her home in Miami, FL, in early 2020. When he started to display quintessential stallion-like behavior, she called her veterinarian, Dr. Joseph Zerilli, to help her determine the cause of this very “un-gelding like” behavior.

“I was told that he had been gelded while in The Netherlands, but when he came home, he was acting exactly like a stud rather than the sweet gelding I thought would be arriving,” said Cruz. “I wasn’t sure what the cause could have been, but I knew something wasn’t right.”

Dr. Zerilli performed a blood test as part of his exam, which revealed very high levels of testosterone for a horse that was supposed to be a gelding. The level of testosterone present was a solid marker for a retained testis, one that would require surgery to remove. Marquis was referred to Dr. Weston Davis, a board-certified surgeon at Palm Beach Equine Clinic in Wellington, FL.

Dr. Davis used a hCG stimulation test and abdominal ultrasound to determine if testicular tissue was present and the source of Marquis’ testosterone levels were confirmed: he was a cryptorchid. Also known as a “rig” or “ridgling,” a cryptorchid horse has one or both testes that are not fully descended into the scrotum. In Marquis’ case, he had a retained left testis within the abdomen.

In a normal stallion, the testes gradually descended from just below the kidneys, through the inguinal canal, and into the scrotum. This happens either in utero or during the first few weeks of life. Occasionally, either one or both testes fail to descend for reasons that are still not fully understood by veterinarians. A cryptorchid stallion can be further classified as either inguinal when the testis is in the inguinal canal, or abdominal when the testis remains in the abdominal cavity, which was the case for Marquis.

cryptorchid marquis surgery laparoscopy Dr. Weston Davis Palm Beach Equine Clinic

“During surgery, the horse was placed under general anesthesia and we used the laparoscopic camera inserted into the abdomen to examine the retained testis,” said Dr. Davis.

A laparoscopy is an endoscopic procedure where a fiberoptic video camera and surgical instruments are introduced into the abdomen through a small incision. This permits the observation of the inside of the abdomen and allows abdominal surgeries to be performed without a large incision into the abdominal cavity.

“We could see that there was torsion, which indicates restricted blood flow and often pain, as well as severe enlargement,” said Dr. Davis. “The testis, which had become quite large, was then exteriorized through an enlarged paramedian incision. Marquis recovered from anesthesia without complication and with an excellent prognosis.”

“The biggest victory in this rather rare case is that the horse was relieved of pretty severe discomfort and the owner could enjoy the gelding disposition she was expecting.”

Dr. Davis

Aside from pain from the torsion and subsequent enlargement within the body, Marquis’ risk of developing malignant (cancerous) tumors was increased with the testis left inside his body. Prompt diagnosis and surgery likely prevented more critical problems in the future for Marquis.

After recovering from surgery at Palm Beach Equine Clinic’s onsite hospital, Marquis was returned home to Cruz without his retained testis and a new attitude.

“I am very grateful to have had my horse seen by Dr. Weston Davis and his staff. I am not only happy that he was able to get his surgery with one of the best surgeons in the country, but also that it was such a success.”

Debbie Cruz
Marquis owned by Debbie Cruz - cryptorchid success story by veterinary surgeon Dr. Weston Davis
Marquis owned by Debbie Cruz

Marquis’ recovery progressed quickly after he returned to his home barn, and he is now back in the tack with Cruz. “I am looking forward to a long journey with him,” she said. “I am thankful to everyone at Palm Beach Equine Clinic for the care they provided Marquis. I couldn’t see myself going anywhere else.”

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