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Category: Team

Meet the PBEC Team: Dr. Caitlin Hosea

Get to know our team of equine veterinarians

Read more about Dr. Caitlin Hosea by clicking here.


Where are you from originally, and where did you complete your undergraduate degree?

Dr. Hosea: I was born and raised in Santa Barbara, California. I received my bachelor’s in animal science at the University of Kentucky with an emphasis on equine studies.

What is your background with horses?

Dr. Hosea: I started riding at a very young age. Through junior high and high school, I was a working student at a hunter/jumper barn. I groomed and taught summer camps to pay for my lessons and shows. During undergrad, I worked as a groom and rider for a few different barns in Lexington and continued to show my horse. I have a new horse now – one of my favorites from the racetrack that was given to me. He’s shown some talent over fences. Hopefully you’ll see us in the jumper ring soon!

Dr. Hosea showing her horse Everest at the LA Equestrian Center.

What inspired you to become an equine veterinarian?

Dr. Hosea: My interest in veterinary medicine developed after moving to Kentucky. My goal had always been to ride professionally. That all changed when I got a job as a veterinary technician. I spent four years working at a large equine hospital. I also had a second job as a technician for a racetrack veterinarian. During that time, I gained a wealth of knowledge and exposure to a wide variety of interesting cases and eventually decided that I wanted to go to vet school.

What do you enjoy most about working at Palm Beach Equine Clinic?

Dr. Hosea with the team of emergency medical personnel at WEF.

Dr. Hosea: I love the variety of cases we treat in the hospital and the opportunities to learn from our large team of talented veterinarians. I always enjoy spending time at WEF as well. I feel very lucky to be able to watch some of the best riders and horses in the world compete at one of the best venues in the country. As a junior, I idolized riders such as Beezie Madden, Margie Engle, and Eric Lamaze to name a few. While onsite at WEF, I am able to watch those riders (as well as a long list of other talented equestrians) compete at the highest levels in person. It’s like having floor seats at a Lakers game.

What aspects of equine medicine interest you most, and what types of cases do you find most rewarding?

Dr. Hosea: Sport horse lameness, podiatry, equine neonatal medicine, and diagnostic imaging, especially ultrasound. Complicated lameness cases are what I really enjoy. After my internship at PBEC, I spent five years working at Keeneland as a racetrack veterinarian. During that time, I was fortunate enough to work with some remarkable horsemen and truly amazing horses. For me, being part of a team that works together to advance a horse’s athletic career is incredibly rewarding.

What experience do you have with equine podiatry?

Dr. Hosea: I’ve always had a strong interest in podiatry. Between my second and third year of veterinary school, I spent eight weeks completing a farrier certification program at Oklahoma State Horse Shoeing School in Ardmore, Oklahoma. During this time, I was shoeing horses every day as well as building hand-made horseshoes in a fire from plain bar stock. By the time I finished, I could shoe a horse all the way around; build, shape, and fit steel shoes; draw clips; and weld bar shoes.

Fostering Future Veterinarians

Palm Beach Equine Clinic Provides Veterinary Students Opportunities to Further Education and Career

Equine Veterinary Internship. Palm Beach Equine Clinic surgeon Dr. Bob Brusie (left) with former Intern, and now Associate Veterinarian, Dr. Santiago Demierre (right).
Palm Beach Equine Clinic surgeon Dr. Bob Brusie (left) with former Intern, and now Associate Veterinarian, Dr. Santiago Demierre (right).

The path of veterinary medicine involves many years of devotion to education, both at the undergraduate and graduate level, prior to putting that knowledge into practice. Only a handful of those students choose to pursue equine medicine, and an even smaller subset then take on the challenge of becoming a board-certified specialist in their chosen field.

Since its inception 40 years ago, Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC) has been committed to supporting the next generation of equine veterinarians and has provided numerous students, at various stages in their education, with learning opportunities and mentorship. Through externship, internship, and residency programs, PBEC has helped prepare students and veterinary graduates to lay the groundwork for successful future careers.

Equine Veterinary Internship at Palm Beach Equine Clinic in Wellington Florida.

Equine Medicine in the Equestrian Capital

One of the key benefits of the programs is that PBEC is based in Wellington, Florida, an area that has rightfully earned its title of “Winter Equestrian Capital of the World.” The region is home to show jumping, dressage, polo, racing, and western performance horses; allowing ample opportunities for veterinarians to become well-rounded sports medicine practitioners.

“We are one of the foremost equine medical centers in North America and based in the epicenter of the equine industry,” said Dr. Scott Swerdlin, the president of PBEC who also spearheads the clinic’s Internship Committee. “The opportunities we are able to offer students looking to pursue a career in sports medicine are unmatched. In this regard, we are fortunate to attract top talent from some of the most prestigious universities around the world. Our interns get to be part of all the action and learn in an environment where every aspect of the horse’s health is examined with a fine-tooth comb.”

A Melting Pot of Expertise

PBEC’s team encompasses over 35 veterinarians who hail from across the U.S. and abroad to Canada, Colombia, Argentina, Australia, the U.K., and beyond. Their areas of expertise are wide-ranging, from lameness to acupuncture and breeding to dentistry, including board-certified specialists in surgery, diagnostic imaging, and internal medicine.

Dr. Sidney Chanutin grew up immersed in the horse world and spent time shadowing nearly every veterinarian at PBEC while she was in high school. After earning her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Florida, she returned to officially join the PBEC team as an intern.

Equine Veterinary Internship. Former Intern, and now Associate PBEC Veterinarian, Dr. Sidney Chanutin.
Former Intern, and now Associate PBEC Veterinarian, Dr. Sidney Chanutin.

“What I most enjoyed about my internship was learning from a diverse group of veterinarians,” said Dr. Chanutin, “along with their different backgrounds, styles of working, and varied approaches to problem-solving. Everyone is willing to help and offer their unique perspective, so it’s a truly cohesive team.”

The first introduction to PBEC for many students is an externship. Qualified veterinary students in their final years of school can spend a few weeks with the PBEC team shadowing emergency cases in the hospital, on ambulatory calls, and at sports medicine appointments at the industry’s top competition venues. Externships also act as an introduction to the practice for many students seeking an internship upon graduation. This allows both the aspiring veterinarian and the PBEC team to become familiar with each other and see if it may potentially be a good match for a 12-month internship position.

Dr. Santiago Demierre is originally from Argentina and completed his degree in veterinary medicine from the Universidad de Buenos Aires in 2012. He validated his veterinary degree in the United States in 2017 through a certification program with the American Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. Demierre was an integral part of PBEC initially as an intern before becoming an official staff veterinarian.

“The high caseload and long-term partnerships working and learning alongside great veterinarians helped me not only in improving my professional skills and knowledge but also with other aspects such as communication with clients and colleagues,” Dr. Demierre reflected.

Former Intern, and now Associate PBEC Veterinarian, Dr. Santiago Demierre.

Unlike in human medicine, internships are optional for veterinarians. Once a veterinarian passes the necessary state board exams, they can start treating animals on day one out of school. Choosing to work under the supervision and mentorship of experienced veterinarians allows interns to apply their years of learning in the classroom into clinical practice. At PBEC, interns can learn with the aid of advanced technologies in diagnostic imaging, innovative regenerative therapies, reproduction and fertility software, and specialized surgical suites.

“While we can teach and provide them with a wealth of knowledge and hands-on experience,” Dr. Swerdlin explained, “our interns in return are extremely valuable to us because they bring a fresh mindset and new ideas to the team,” explained Dr. Swerdlin. “The ability to work well with others, a good sense of humor, great work ethic, and most importantly, excellent communication skills are the qualities I look for in an intern.”

Never Stop Learning

Continuing education is a major component of a life in medicine. In addition to journal clubs, educational seminars, and opportunities to travel to professional conferences, students are always exposed to learning opportunities by working collaboratively with colleagues as well as visiting and referring veterinarians.

After completing their internship, most will pursue an associate veterinarian position, whether at PBEC, another private practice, a university, or work independently. Some will go a step further and advance their education through a residency program. Residencies are rigorous two to four year commitments—length dependent on the specialty—designed to give veterinarians the skillset, knowledge base, and experience required to become eligible for certification by veterinary medical specialty boards. Board-certified specialists are considered experts in their field and often treat complicated, difficult cases.

With board-certified specialists on staff, PBEC has provided residencies to select veterinarians over the years, including Dr. Michael Myhre. A graduate of Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Myhre fulfilled his surgical residency under the direction of PBEC’s board-certified surgeons Dr. Robert Brusie, Dr. Weston Davis, and Dr. Jorge Gomez. He assisted on over 568 surgeries over his three years at PBEC.

“Completing my residency at PBEC has allowed me to pursue my dream of becoming an equine surgeon and working at a large referral center in the northeast. I learned a great deal about all aspects of general surgery, but especially orthopedic surgery. We did many fracture repairs at PBEC, and I would love to continue focusing on these in the future. Without my time at PBEC, I wouldn’t be able to practice as I am now,” Dr. Myhre said.

Former Resident Dr. Michael Myhre (left) assisting Dr. Weston Davis with surgery at Palm Beach Equine Clinic. 
Equine Veterinary Internship
Former Resident Dr. Michael Myhre (left) assisting Dr. Weston Davis with surgery at Palm Beach Equine Clinic.

Externs, interns, and residents are integral members of the equine hospital. It is part of PBEC’s mission to support the community, which includes the next generation of equine veterinarians.

Dr. Swerdlin said, “Teaching and mentoring young veterinarians and watching them grow into confident and competent practitioners gives me the greatest satisfaction.” To learn more about externships, internships, and other opportunities with Palm Beach Equine Clinic, please visit equineclinic.com/internships-externships or call 561-793-1599.

Takeaways from Tokyo: The Olympic Experience from a Veterinarian’s Perspective

Dr. Jorge Gomez and Dr. Christopher Elliott were amongst the over 100 veterinarians on the ground supporting the equine athletes at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. Jorge Gomez, MVZ, MS, DACVS, served as the Official Veterinarian for the Mexican Show Jumping Team and is a surgeon with Palm Beach Equine Clinic, and Chris Elliott, BVSC, MRCVS, MANZCVS, DACVSMR, served as Veterinary Services Supervisor and is an associate veterinarian for Palm Beach Equine Clinic. We spoke with each of them about their experiences at this unprecedented international event.


What were your expectations for Tokyo, and did the Games live up to those expectations?

CE: Tokyo 2020 reached far beyond my expectations. The ability to achieve such an elite level of equestrian competition in the face of COVID-19 restrictions is remarkable. The whole Olympic organizing committee should be proud of this achievement.

JG: We all knew of the existing restrictions in place for COVID-19. There were mobility limitations in place to decrease the chances of spreading the virus, however, the Games were very well organized. The competition and training arenas were state-of-the-art facilities, and the stables were all under air conditioning, so those amenities couldn’t have been better.

What did you enjoy most about your time at the Olympics?

CE: Having a front row seat to the Olympic Games has been an honor and a privilege. I have most enjoyed working alongside my veterinary colleagues from across the globe. The Games spirit was strong among all the vets at Tokyo 2020.

JG: Most definitely the level of competition. We had the opportunity to watch the best athletes in all three disciplines dressage, eventing and show jumping.

What was the experience like of working with such a diverse group of veterinarians?

CE: It’s always great working alongside veterinarians from all over the world. Veterinary medicine transcends language and cultural barriers and bonds us all in the goal of preserving equine health and welfare. In the face of many extreme challenges surrounding these Olympic Games, the professionalism, dedication, and efficiency of all vets at the event rose to the fore to ensure the very best in equine health, welfare, and performance.

JG: The experience is always nice and an honor to be a part of. There’s a group of us that have been at many of the international competitions and Olympic Games for years. Then, there are also new faces, and this is a wonderful opportunity for us all to meet. We share difficult cases from our practices as well as talk about new techniques and treatments.


Palm Beach Equine Clinic extends congratulations to all of the athletes that represented their respective countries at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. While challenges were abundant, the events were awe-inspiring and the best of equestrian sport was on display.

PBEC also extends a special congratulations to our friends Dr. Mike Heitmann and Alice Womble, the owners of Sanceo, ridden by Sabine Schut-Kery. Sanceo was a part of the U.S. dressage team that won silver and had two personal best scores at the Tokyo Olympic Games.

Meet MRI Manager Cami Glaff

MRI Manager Cami Glaff Palm Beach Equine Clinic

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Manager Cami Glaff

Modern veterinary diagnostic technologies allow doctors to capture highly detailed images which can make a difference in having the most accurate diagnosis and determining the best course of treatment. Capturing these images, however, is another feat in itself. Imaging Technicians work to create a clear and comprehensive diagnostic profile by operating advanced technologies while keeping the patient still, calm, and comfortable. Spearheading management of all Palm Beach Equine Clinic patients for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is Camille “Cami” Glaff.  A Jupiter, Florida, native, Cami has been an essential team member of PBEC since March of 2016.

Get to know PBEC MRI Manager Cami Glaff


MRI Manager Cami Glaff Palm Beach Equine Clinic

What is your background with horses?

I have been riding horses since the time I learned how to walk. I grew up trail riding and began competing on the hunter/jumper circuits when I was around 10 years old. I pursued a career with horses by studying Business Management with a specialization in Equine Science at St. Andrews University in North Carolina. I represented my school in the saddle by competing on their Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) team throughout my four years there. I spent my first year after graduation as a groom and rider traveling to shows on the circuit. However, I discovered that I was more interested in the medical aspect of the horse industry, and I have been with PBEC ever since.

Have you always worked in the Imaging Department?

I joined Palm Beach Equine Clinic as the MRI Technician and quickly advanced to be the Manager of this department. I have also cross trained in other aspects of our imaging modalities so that I am able to properly operate our Nuclear Scintigraphy and Computed Tomography (CT) technologies as well. When I am not with an MRI or Imaging patient, I try to lend a hand by helping in other departments as needed.

What does a typical day as the MRI Manager entail?

When a horse is dropped off at the Clinic for an MRI, I perform a brief exam to note their vitals, place an intravenous catheter, and pull their shoes off. Once we are ready to begin the MRI, it is my responsibility to make sure we acquire the best images possible for our radiologist, Dr. Sarah Puchalski, to examine. The MRI is extremely sensitive to motion, and because of that I have to ensure that the patient is properly sedated, calm and comfortable so that we can obtain sharp images.

Once the horse is settled into position for whichever site is being scanned, I make slight adjustments to the unit’s magnet to make sure it is in the precise location needed. Depending on the site being scanned, such as the fetlock or suspensory origin, and the patient’s compliance, it may take anywhere from one to two hours to completely image the area. Once the scans are completed and are up to our standards, they are sent directly to our radiologist, Dr. Sarah Puchalski, who generates a complete MRI Report for the client typically within 24 to 48 hours. The hospital staff and I monitor the patient to make sure any sedation is properly wearing off to make sure they are safe to return home. It is always a team effort to make sure everyone is happy and that the horse is receiving the best possible care!

What aspects of your job do you most enjoy?

I enjoy being able to work with different horses each day. Every horse has its own unique reaction to being in a new place and being asked to stand very still throughout the scan. Being able to accurately read and handle each horse is a challenge that I appreciate.

I also find it rewarding to be a part of making a difference in a horse’s treatment plan. Acquiring the best possible images that may have the answers a veterinarian needs to make the most effective treatment plan.

When not at PBEC, what do you enjoy doing or where can we find you?

In my free time, I can usually be found outdoors. Whether I am going hiking with my dog Ryder, exploring new biking trails, or relaxing on the beach, I am always happiest outside.

Meet the PBEC Team: Dr. Gretchen Syburg

Gretchen Syburg Palm Beach Equine Clinic veterinarian

Servicing clients in Ocala, Florida, throughout the winter season, Dr. Gretchen Syburg is the newest addition to the Palm Beach Equine Clinic Team. Get to know a little about Dr. Syburg by reading on!

What is your background with horses?

I grew up on a farm in southeastern Wisconsin and have had horses since before I can remember. I have ridden in many disciplines but have been part of the hunter/jumper community for the past 15 to 20 years. I am definitely a “horse person” through and through, and I knew from a very young age that I wanted to be an equine veterinarian.

I completed my undergraduate degree at Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisconsin, then obtained my degree in veterinary medicine from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Upon graduating, I completed an internship at a large referral hospital in California.  In California I was able to gain extensive experience in all aspects of equine medicine, especially in complex orthopedic and sports medicine cases. After that, I worked for a practice where I spent my summers in the Northeast, mainly following the show circuits, then winters in Florida before joining Palm Beach Equine Clinic.

Why did you want to become an equine veterinarian?

Growing up on a farm, animals have always been a huge part of my life. My love for animals was evident at a young age, when I would spend my free time in the barn with our variety of animals. I caught the horse bug when I was five, and from then on it was clear my path was to pursue veterinary school.  I knew that the equine veterinary industry was where my interest would lie due to the complex and interesting cases I had seen come through our farm. 

What area do you specialize in?

I am on the road year-round, spending my summers in southeastern Wisconsin, servicing clients throughout the Midwest. During the winter months, I am in Ocala, Florida, providing care to patients at both HITS and WEC horse shows.  Being an ambulatory veterinarian, I offer a very broad range of services to cover the needs of my patients and clients. I focus primarily on sports medicine and the performance horse, but emergency medicine and basic internal medicine cases are another part of my caseload.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

I cherish the relationships that I build, not only with my equine patients, but also with clients. Being a horse person, I really understand the deep connections that my clients have with their horses. Having owned horses myself, I can relate to the trials and tribulations of horse ownership.

I appreciate being able to see all our collective efforts come to fruition when my clients are able to compete their horses or achieve their goals. I admire the moments when clients are grateful for their horse’s health above all else; it truly is a team effort and I love being able to see the reward of a horse in optimal health.

When not treating patients, what do you enjoy doing or where can we find you?

Gretchen Syburg and Nike - ESI Photography
Dr. Gretchen Syburg with her horse Nike. Photo by ESI Photography.

I enjoy spending as much time as possible outside, riding my horse Nike or hiking with my dog Luna. Most of the time you will find me in the barn or enjoying the occasional horse show. I am grateful for the time during the summer with my family in Wisconsin, we still have a small farm and now

Dr. Janet Greenfield Davis Earns Equine Rehabilitation and Performance Certification

dr. janet greenfield rehabilitation performance certificate
Dr. Janet Greenfield Davis (right) earns certification in Equine Rehabilitation and Performance from the Integrative Veterinary Medical Institute.

Dr. Janet Greenfield Davis has recently notched another professional title to her name as a Certified Equine Rehabilitation and Performance Veterinarian (CERPV). The certification through the Integrative Veterinary Medical Institute aims to enhance the high-level sport horse medicine practitioner’s ability to localize the root cause of performance deficits, evaluate the horse’s biomechanics on a segmented level, and select the appropriate rehabilitation tools. The CERPV distinguishes veterinarians who possess the knowledge and skills to spot slight variations in a horse’s gait and performance before they lead to lameness and deliver an elevated quality of rehabilitation management.

“I chose to pursue this certification as an extension of my understanding of the many intricacies with both movement and muscle of the sport horse. This deeper understanding goes toward helping keep my clients’ horses in the best condition for peak performance, heal stronger after injury, and prevent injuries from happening in the first place.”

Dr. Greenfield Davis

Dr. Greenfield Davis built on her knowledge of how the equine athlete functions through in-depth courses on the anatomy, biomechanics, and neuromuscular control in performance horses. Specific courses focused on the physiology and function of muscles, tendons, and joints with an emphasis on ways to develop strong tissue to avoid injury. Dr. Greenfield Davis analyzed how and when to apply specific rehabilitation tools; lasers, therapeutic ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pulsed electro-magnetic field technology, vibration plates, hyperbaric therapy, hydrotherapy, and regenerative medicine. The certification also emphasized the effects of a foal’s environment on its future athletic performance, issues that may arise when conditioning young, growing horses, and nutrition at different levels of training.

Dr. Janet Greenfield Davis Vinceremos Therapeutic Riding Center

This CERPV adds to her current titles of Bachelors of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (BVMS) from the University of Glasgow – a degree akin to US based universities’ Doctor of Veterinary Medicine – and her designation as a Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (MRCVS). Dr. Greenfield also earned her Certification in Veterinary Acupuncture (CVA) through the Chi Institute (presently Chi University) which she applies to her large and small animal patients. Acting as a mentor to aspiring Chinese and alternative medicine practitioners, Dr. Greenfield has advised students enrolled in acupuncture studies. She has provided insight to many veterinary students through Palm Beach Equine Clinic’s Externship Program as well.

Dr. Paul Wollenman Honored as 2021 Philip Iglehart Award Inductee by the Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame

Palm Beach Equine Clinic Veterinarian Paul Wollenman

Palm Beach Equine Clinic Founder Recognized for Outstanding Contributions to the Sport of Polo

The Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame will honor Dr. Paul Wollenman as a 2021 Inductee of the Philip Iglehart Award in recognition of his exceptional lifetime contributions to the sport of polo on a regional and national level.

Beginning his career as the youngest graduate of Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine at only 21-years-old, he has dedicated nearly five decades to the polo and veterinary industries. He has taken an integral role in the polo community by educating teams on proper care and supporting the world’s top equine athletes. Dr. Wollenman has worked in an advisory capacity for the Equine Welfare Committee of the United States Polo Association (USPA). He has mentored Team USPA participants and the National Youth Tournament Series teams by giving lectures, counseling members on proper horse care, and aiding with their veterinary issues. As an amateur 2-goal handicap player himself, Dr. Wollenman is fortunate to thoroughly enjoy the sport and career in which he is revered.

When asked his thoughts on the Iglehart Induction announcement, Dr. Wollenman said, “Over the years, I had occasionally heard my name mentioned when people besides famous high-goal players were inducted. When Chrys Beal called to tell me that I was voted unanimously into this year’s honorees, I felt somewhat embarrassed and undeserving. Still, the influx of congratulatory phone calls and messages I have received about my induction from owners, polo players, and grooms has made me even more happy and proud of my life and career choices.

“I’ve been blessed by many wonderful and colorful relationships with friends and clients in the polo community,” Dr. Wollenman continued. “Most of all, I am incredibly lucky and thankful for my wife, Renee, who understands the demands of veterinary medicine and polo. She played polo collegiately and throughout her adult life, raised two wonderful sons who have both become doctors, and has supported me throughout the long, arduous hours of veterinary medicine.

“I’ve been so fortunate to have great veterinary partners and smart, driven associates who have helped build Palm Beach Equine Clinic not only into a massively successful equine hospital, but also an enjoyable place to work and grow professionally. It is truly my second home and has allowed me to concentrate on polo medicine,” he concluded.

Photos by the United States Polo Association.

“During a career that spans 48 years, Dr. Wollenman’s expertise as a veterinarian caring for the horses of some of the nation’s finest polo teams has been a factor in helping the sport of polo. Noted for his sound and practical advice as well as ingenious solutions to complicated injuries, he has spent most of a lifetime striving to improve the care and welfare of the horses that make polo possible.”

2021 Honorees Announcement by the Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame.

The Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame will recognize Dr. Wollenman and the 2021 Inductees this February through their media channels. A formal Induction Ceremony and Gala will be held in February of 2022 in lieu of the COVID-19 pandemic so that inductees’ families, friends and fans may be present. Dr. Wollenman was nominated by a committee of eminent and knowledgeable individuals across the sport of polo who voted to elect this year’s winners.

Read about the 2021 Polo Hall of Fame Inductees by going to the Museum’s Facebook page linked below.

2021 POLO HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES CHOSEN For the 32nd year of inductions into the Polo Hall of Fame, we have the honor…

Posted by Museum of Polo & Hall of Fame on Tuesday, November 3, 2020

More News on Dr. Paul Wollenman

Meet the PBEC Team: Hospital Manager Holly Hall

palm beach equine clinic hospital manager holly jacobs hall

To properly operate an equine hospital, each member of the team must have the same goal in mind: high quality health care. Strong teamwork and leadership are essential, and Palm Beach Equine Clinic is fortunate to have our Equine Hospital led by Holly Hall. Born and raised in West Palm Beach, Florida, Holly has been an indispensable member of Palm Beach Equine Clinic family for over five years.

Get to know PBEC Hospital Manager Holly Hall


What is your background with horses?

My parents introduced me to horseback riding lessons when I was young. I originally rode English for a few years before finding that I had more of a desire for speed. I started barrel racing when I was eight years old and haven’t stopped since. My parents bought me my first horse when I was about nine years old, and soon that one horse turned into multiple horses. Throughout my high school years, I went to school in the mornings, worked at the barn in the evenings, and barrel raced on the weekends.

Holly with her mare Benelli.

What was your original role at Palm Beach Equine Clinic?

Originally, I joined PBEC as a part time night technician and have since worked my way up to Hospital Management. Since my first days at PBEC, I have always loved the endless knowledge and experiences that I encounter and grow from every day. I immediately took an interest in emergency and surgical cases. I took every opportunity I could to experience and learn as many new things as possible about equine health.

Although my official position has always been with the hospital, I have gained experience in other aspects of the clinic throughout my time here. I am one of PBEC’s primary surgical technicians, have skills in preforming laboratory procedures, have worked with multiple doctor’s as their ambulatory technician, traveled to horse shows with our team, transported emergencies in our ambulance, and much more! I am always eager to lend a hand and take advantage of any opportunity to learn something new.

What are your daily responsibilities?

Throughout the day I manage patient care, hospital organization and our team of hospital technicians. I am responsible for updating patient’s Clinician Orders as per doctor’s orders and scheduling each patient’s treatment plan for the next 24 to 48 hours. The hospital technicians use these Clinician Orders to treat each patient and update medical records. Along with the technicians, I assist in completing treatments, procedures, surgeries, laboratory tasks, assist with admittance and prepare hospital patients for discharge. I also ensure that the hospital is well-stocked for any patient needs.

I am responsible for managing the technicians and their work schedules as we are an Emergency Hospital. The hospital is staffed with skilled technicians 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. This includes all holidays and throughout storms. Our hospital team is responsible for the care of all PBEC patients, including the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)/surgery, Isolation (Quarantine), Annex (horse show) and Imaging stalls. Although our responsibilities seem endless, our hospital staff has a great system of communicating and we are dedicated to working hard for our patients and clients.

What aspects of Hospital Management do you most enjoy?

I really enjoy the intensity of helping with emergency cases and working in a surgical setting. Being a part of the initial work up, diagnostics, and watching our patients progress on their road to recovery is very satisfying. You never stop learning in medicine, and I appreciate the endless opportunities that I have to learn. 

Holly Jacobs Hall Palm Beach Equine CLinic

It is also interesting to be able to work with such a wide variety of horses. As technicians first and foremost, we must have the skills as horsemen to recognize the horse’s behaviors for personality traits versus potential changes to the state of their health. Carefully recognizing these symptoms and abnormal behaviors contributes to each patient’s treatment and enables us to make sure the horses are as comfortable and happy as possible.

Although our work is focused on the horses, we work with a large team of people to provide with best care possible. All our staff –veterinarians, technicians, interns, residents, specialists, surgeons, laboratory, pharmacy, imaging, and office administration –contribute to high quality patient care. I enjoy being a part of this team and watching all our efforts come together for our patients and client needs.

When not in the Equine Hospital, what do you enjoy doing or where can we find you?

My husband and I love being outdoors. We typically find ourselves out in the woods, on the water, or (of course) on the back of a fast horse! We mostly enjoy air boating and barrel races during our free time. Enjoying the company of our close family and friends, while doing what we love the most.

Holly and Benelli competing in the National Barrel Horse Association Finals in 2018.
Holly and Benelli competing in the National Barrel Horse Association Finals in 2018.
Holly Jacobs Hall Palm Beach Equine CLinic
Holly airboating with her husband Dustin.
Holly Jacobs Palm Beach Equine Clinic Hospital Manager

Meet the PBEC Team: Intern Dr. Charley McColough

Meet the Palm Beach Equine Clinic Team | Dr. Charley McColough
Charley McColough, BVetMed, MRCVS

Dr. McColough completed his undergraduate studies at Wake Forest University with a double major in Biology and Spanish. Upon graduation, Dr. McColough obtained a certification in Phlebotomy and worked as a Biomedical Research Technician for Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. In this position, he performed hematology and oncology research assays, blood and bone marrow processing, separation, analysis, and cryopreservation, and analyzed cells for DNA extraction.

Dr. McColough volunteered for the Sea Research Foundation in his home state of Connecticut, where he led immunophenotyping for the Marine Mammal Immunological Diagnostics Program that was funded by the Office of Naval Research. His efforts in data analysis contributed to the programs ability to receive grant funding. Dr. McColough also volunteered for the Aquatic Animal Health Center of New York Aquarium as a veterinary assistant where he worked with diverse marine life, such as penguins, walruses, otters, seals, and various fish and amphibians.

Evolving from sea to land animals, Dr. McColough gained experience as a veterinary technician for a small animal hospital in New York City, and then decided to pursue a doctorate in veterinary medicine at the Royal Veterinary College of London in the United Kingdom. Throughout his studies, he completed several research projects, including the investigation of early loss of pregnancy in thoroughbred mares, and the culture, fluorescent microscopy, and flow cytometric analysis of primary equine trophoblast cells. Dr. McColough completed an externship at Palm Beach Equine Clinic during his final year of veterinary school and has been keen on pursuing a career in equine sports medicine.

Palm Beach Equine Clinic is proud to welcome new intern Charley McColough, BVetMed, MRCVS, to our team! Learn more about Dr. McColough:


What inspired you to become a veterinarian?

The dream started for me while I was a Research Intern at the Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, CT. I was performing immunology assays on beluga whale blood and working closely with the veterinary team. I was both profoundly impressed and mystified by the skill set and knowledge base that the veterinarians exhibited. Simply put, I wanted to know what they knew.

Why did you choose to pursue equine medicine?

I have wanted to work with large animals since I was a veterinary technician at a small animal practice in Greenwich Village of New York City. I was working with toy breed dogs – some of which never seemed to set foot on the ground – all the while dreaming about working outside with large animals. I was drawn to, and began my veterinary profession in, the equestrian industry because I have been keenly interested in the athleticism of the horse.

Are there any standout cases that you have especially enjoyed working on so far at PBEC?

There was a case that was referred to PBEC following a laceration and repair in the region of the lower jaw. The horse recovered from the laceration but saliva would spurt from the wound when the horse ate. It was amazing to watch the PBEC team catheterize the parotid salivary duct from the buccal surface of the mouth and use ultrasound to catheterize the same duct as it left the parotid gland caudal to the mandibular ramus. The surgeons were able to dissect down and locate both ends of the severed parotid duct and oppose them over a continuous catheter placed from the gland to the buccal surface. Essentially, they found two needles in a haystack and reconnected them to allow proper flow of saliva for the horse.

When not at PBEC, what do you enjoy doing and where can we find you?

Charley McColough Family

In past years, you might have found me on a rock climbing wall or tossing a Frisbee in a wide open field. Nowadays, you’ll find me at home with my wife Ashley and our 9-month-old son Max, making tacos and burgers out of his Fisher-Price food truck.

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